Remembrance Day and the Workplace

Since 1919, Canadians across the country have gathered at commemorative ceremonies to observe a moment of silence at the 11th hour of the 11th the day of the 11th month to honor members of our armed forces who have died in the line of duty.

An Act to amend the Holidays Act (Remembrance Day), known as Bill C-311, received royal assent on March 1, 2018 making Remembrance Day a legal holiday throughout Canada.

However, it has yet to be recognized as a statutory holiday in every province.

Due to the distribution of legislative powers in Canada, the provinces and territories determine which days are public holidays for the vast majority of employees.

While some employers in those provinces where it is not a statutory holiday choose to give their employees Remembrance Day off, they are not required to do so.

In Manitoba, employers are not required to pay employees who do not work on Remembrance Day.

According to the Nova Scotia government, employees who work on the holiday will be entitled to receive another day off with pay agreed upon between the employee and the employer.

As for Ontario and Quebec, Remembrance Day is not recognized as a statutory holiday but some employers give employees time off.

Rest assured, SEIU-West and the Labour movement will keep fighting to ensure that ALL workers across Canada will be able to observe this important holiday.

For more information on this, click here and here.

 

 

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